The seasons guide us to make provisions for life circling the sun.

Seasonal Wellness

As seasons change, so do you. Our formulas are intentionally made to support you through the natural shifts and challenges of each season.

three women at an apple tree. one sitting on a branch, one sitting at the base of the trunk, one standing at it's side. all of them are looking away.
black and white gestural line drawings, vaguely reminiscent of the sky
winter
spring
summer
autumn
winter
spring
summer
autumn
hands cupping apple blossoms
the door of a greenhouse open, revealing a luscious green jungle of passionflower vines and ginger growing. there is a barn in the background.
black and white gestural line drawings, vaguely reminiscent of the sky

Intricately Connected

We make our products in small, seasonal batches and source almost exclusively from the Catskill Mountains, where we’ve developed deep relationships with the land and local farmers.

This is a copper still. We use it to hand distill a variety of plants into hydrosols, or floral waters. The oldest known alembic still is nearly 4000 years old!

black and white line drawing of a copper pot still, used for distilling hydrosols
black and white gestural line drawings, vaguely reminiscent of the sky

Individual Wellness Boxes — Shop by Season

Where it comes from

The Seasonal Herb Library

  • All
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Autumn
  • Winter
  • Cleavers

    Galium aparine

    Sometimes called “stickyweed,” cleavers are well-known to hikers and gardeners for taking a ride on pant legs. Oddly enough, this tender green is an ideal springtime tonic known by herbalists for helping bodies to let go instead of clinging on! Cleavers support the systems of detoxification and overall kidney function.* Its leaves are often used fresh in herbal juices (a.k.a. a succus) or preserved in vinegar or a tincture.

    Where it's from

    We gather ours from an abundant and green riparian buffer in the Catskill Mountains.

    What It's In

  • Nettle

    Urtica dioica

    An earthy springtime green and potent source of vitamins and minerals, like A, C, E, iron, and calcium. Traditionally, this nutrient-dense herb is collected when young, and the leaves are prepared in seasonal foods–like pesto and creamy soups–and preserved in teas, tinctures, and vinegars. We use this tonic to strengthen our bodies during the shifting seasons and to support sinus and respiratory system health.*

    Where it's from

    We harvest nettle from stands we tend year over year in the Hudson Valley and supplement with organically grown nettle from our friends at Foster Farms in Calais, Vermont.

  • Violet

    Viola spp.

    Energetically cooling and moistening, violet is known as a demulcent in herbalism–which means it soothes irritated tissues inside and out.* Violet’s heart-shaped leaves and delicate purple flowers are traditionally enjoyed in spring teas, sprinkled over cakes,  infused into nourishing topical oils, or preserved in tinctures and vinegars.

    Where it's from

    We collect our violet flowers and leaves from the Hudson Valley.

    What It's In

  • Dandelion

    Taraxacum officinale

    One of the most misunderstood weeds by most, but beloved by herbalists. The root is roasted for an earthy coffee-like flavor and used as a bitter to stimulate and support healthy digestive system function.* The leaves are nutrient-dense and good for supporting the kidneys and natural systems of detoxification.* Dandelion is traditionally used in salads, soups, teas, tinctures, and bitters.

    Where it's from

    We dig up our hearty, wild dandelion from land we tend to in the Hudson Valley.

    What It's In

  • Sweet Birch

    Betula lenta

    A prolific and well-loved plant native to the Northeast and Appalachia ecosystems. When you scratch the tree’s twigs it releases a fragrant wintergreen aroma, which can be carefully extracted from the tree’s bark. Its lightly spicy and caramel-like taste has made it a favorite addition to rootbeer and herbal teas. The methyl salicylate present in birch is similar to compounds found in aspirin, making it a popular herb for minor discomforts internally and externally.*

    Where it's from

    Collected in the birch groves of the Catskill mountains.

    What It's In

  • Chickweed

    Stellaria media

    Chickweed is a native to Europe that’s now a naturalized “weed” throughout North America and beyond. This ground cover generally pops up in early spring and is appropriately named, as it’s beloved by both humans and chickens. Traditionally this cooling, vibrant green is infused into herbal salads, vinegar, and formulas for a boost of nutrition–including calcium, magnesium, iron, and vitamin C. Topically it’s commonly used in a poultice or salve to soothe minor irritations.*

    Where it's from

    Wild-collected in the Hudson Valley.

    What It's In

  • Rose

    Rosa spp.

    A universal symbol for romance, this rosy red flower is used cross-culturally to spread love and lift spirits. The blooms are traditionally distilled into hydrosols and essential oils and used in perfumery for their uplifting and enchanting qualities. Rose is deeply calming and helpful for calming heat.* Rose waters and petals are commonly used in  traditional foods and infused into drinks, desserts, and syrups.

    Where it's from

    We gather luscious beach roses from bushes along the Atlantic coastline, from wild brambles in the Hudson Valley, as well as cultivated varieties from our friends at Whistledown Farm, a certified-organic family farm in Hudson, NY.

  • Tulsi

    Ocimum tenuiflorum

    Used for thousands of years in Ayurveda, this aromatic nervine makes life feel a bit brighter. There are a few different species commonly used in herbalism—including Rama, Krishna, and Vana—that all stem from the mint family and are rich in essential oils and compounds that help to soothe the nervous system and boost healthy immune function.* The leaves are traditionally used whole or powdered in ghee, oil, tea, and other traditional foods. We love adding it to tinctures and other seasonal elixirs.

    Where it's from

    Grown for us by our friends at Whistledown Farm, a certified-organic family farm in Hudson, NY.

    What It's In

  • Calendula

    Calendula officinalis

    This vibrant, resinous summer flower most commonly blooms in yellow and orange, and is traditionally used as a coloring agent, in foods, and as a favorite amongst herbalists in skincare. Its rich skin-nourishing properties make it an ideal herb for inside and out, commonly used to soothe irritated skin and the digestive tract.* You can infuse it into teas, soups, baths, salves, lotions, and more. The fresh petals are great at brightening up your mood and your salads.

    Where it's from

    Grown by our friends at Apis Apotheca Farm in Elizaville, New York.

  • Milky Oat

    Avena sativa

    When harvested during the early growth stage, the milky oat tops have a nourishing white latex-like substance, which is rich in vitamins and minerals and especially helpful for strengthening the nerves.* Milky oats are energetically cooling and sweet and the plant’s mucilaginous quality helps to protect and build up healthy nervous system function.*

    Where it's from

    Grown for us by our friends at Whistledown Farm, a certified-organic family farm in Hudson, NY.

    What It's In

  • Skullcap

    Scutellaria lateriflora

    A native to North America, this herb’s first documented use was shared by the indigenous peoples here. Its delicate purple flowers are an indication of harvest time, as it signals when it’s at its most potent stage. Herbalists use this herb more than ever, a powerful nervine and tonic to soothe and restore healthy nervous system function.* Most commonly used in teas and tinctures.

    Where it's from

    Grown for us by our friends at Whistledown Farm, a certified-organic family farm in Hudson, NY.

    What It's In

  • Reishi

    Ganoderma tsugae

    Known in China as the “mushroom of immortality,” this adaptogenic orangey-red mushroom is revered for its ability to boost overall stamina and immune function.* These hearty mushrooms grow at the base of logs and trees and generally have a lacquer-like finish. Reishi is traditionally wild-collected and infused into teas, broths, and other traditional eastern medicines. We enjoy its earthy, rich taste paired with our sweeter herbal preserves.

    Where it's from

    Hand-collected from coniferous hemlock groves in the Catskill mountains & cultivated by Healing Spirits Herb Farm in Avoca, New York.

  • St. John's Wort

    Hypericum perforatum

    This powerful sunny summer bloom has bright yellow star-shaped flowers, which is what herbalists use to lift spirits and support nervous system health.* When fresh, the flowers can be pressed and ooze a bright red substance–an indicator of when its herbal medicine is at its peak. Commonly used topically for irritated skin and preserved in tinctures, which yields a potent ruby-red extract.

    Where it's from

    Grown by our friends at Healing Spirit Herb Farm in Avoca, New York.

    What It's In

  • Gingko

    Ginkgo biloba

    Ginkgo is an ancient relic, a prehistoric tree that no longer exists in the wild. Its bright yellow leaves help us remember and keep us sharp. Traditionally the leaves are used as herbal medicine and the nuts of the tree are enjoyed in congee, a traditional Asian porridge, and at celebrations like weddings and Chinese New Year. We use the leaves in our herbal formulas to support cognitive health.*

    Where it's from

    Collected from trees in the Hudson Valley.

    What It's In

  • Yellow Dock

    Rumex crispus

    The bitter, earthy root of yellow dock contains berberine, an important active constituent, and what gives yellow dock its colorful hue and name. This bitter active supports the liver and digestive system, and the whole plant is commonly used to support iron absorption.* We use it in bitters and for liver support in our tinctures.

    Where it's from

    Wild-collected in the Hudson Valley and grown organically by Sawmill Herb Farm in Florence, Massachusetts.

  • Ginger

    Zingiber officinale

    This warming rhizome is a favorite amongst cooks, infused in just about everything from candies and curries to beer and teas. Its warming qualities help to stimulate the body and herbal formulas. Its zingy flavor makes herbal blends tastier, and when used at the right dose is a great way to support digestive health and relieve stomach cramping.*

    Where it's from

    Grown by Green Owl Farm in Rhinebeck, New York.

    What It's In

  • Elderberry

    Sambucus spp.

    The entire elder tree from flower to berry is used in traditional crafts and herbalism, but the berry is beloved by herbalists for its juicy purple hue and immune-boosting properties.* High in flavonoids that are rich in antioxidants, this herb works overtime to protect the body and activate its defenses.* It’s commonly harvested fresh in fall and made into juice, wine, syrups, and dried for teas.

    Where it's from

    Grown for us by our friends at Whistledown Farm, a certified-organic family farm in Hudson, New York.

    What It's In

  • Turkey Tail

    Trametes versicolor

    These mushrooms are built tough and strong enough to support your immune system through the changing seasons. Unlike the more tender fungi, turkey tail mushrooms are super hardy and are best when cooked down into broth, tinctures, or ground up for beverages. They contain a high level of beta-glucans which support overall body health and give a boost to the immune system.*

    Where it's from

    Wild-gathered in the Catskill Mountains and Hudson Valley & cultivated by Healing Spirits Herb Farm in Avoca, New York.

  • Lion's Mane

    Hericium erinaceus

    This shaggy-looking mushroom is named perfectly. You can find this mushroom in the wild by its hairy-looking white spines growing off fallen logs and dying trees. Well-loved by cooks and herbalists, this mushroom can be sauteed or skewered for flavor or used as brain food.* Many studies have also shown that Lion’s mane supports the production of nerve growth factor.*

    Where it's from

    Cultivated by Tivoli Mushrooms in Hudson, New York & Healing Spirits Herb Farm in Avoca, New York.

  • Hawthorn

    Crataegus spp.

     Hawthorn leaves, flowers, and fruit contain chemical compounds that have been studied and shown to increase blood flow to the heart, as well as support overall cardiovascular health.* Energetically, hawthorn opens the heart to forgiveness and is believed by many herbalists to soothe grief. Their large thorns remind us of the value of healthy boundaries. 

    Where it's from

    Wild-Harvested from stands in the Catskills.

  • White Pine

    Pinus strobus

    This bright and citrusy green comes from one of our favorite evergreen trees. High in vitamin C and essential oils, white pine needles are a circulatory stimulant that bolsters the immune and respiratory systems.* We like to use it during the colder seasons to avoid winter woes and support the immune system.*

    Where it's from

    Carefully collected, primarily from windfall, in the Hudson Valley.

    What It's In

  • Rose Hips

    Rosa spp.

    This juicy and jammy fruit is small but mighty. Rich in vitamin C and perfectly tart, this herbal food is a great way to store the bounty of the sunny seasons all winter long. The rose hips can be used fresh and infused into tinctures, cordials, and other elixirs, or dried to use in teas through the year when you need a healthy boost.*

    Where it's from

    Collected from wild rose bushes in the Catskill mountains and Hudson Valley.